Sunday, 17 December 2017

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Ecovative and Mushrooms in Packaging

Ecovative is a company that was founded in 2007, when two friends teamed up in a class to invent a new insulation material using natural products. Since then, Ecovative has formed and blossomed into a leading company in mushroom packaging manufacturing.

Ecovative is a company that was founded in 2007, when two friends teamed up in a class to invent a new insulation material using natural products. Since then, Ecovative has formed and blossomed into a leading company in mushroom packaging manufacturing. They call themselves “a world leading Biomaterials Company creating and scaling environmentally-friendly products that are cost and performance competitive with conventional materials.” They currently have two facilities, and aim to completely rid the packaging industry of toxic and unsustainable materials. They are company that is truly committed to helping save our environment.

Are mushrooms the next big move toward zero-waste packaging?

With the sudden concern over the past decade or so about global warming and our carbon footprint, businesses have started to become more aware of their waste and lasting effects on our environment. Among these companies is Ecovative, a company devoted to developing natural, environmental-friendly packaging materials that not only help lower waste, but are actually beneficial to the environment. Amongst these materials is an unlikely plant- mushrooms.

 

 

How are mushrooms possible working as packaging material?

‘’How is mushroom packaging made? ‘’

Sure, this whole thing seems like a simple enough idea. Just use mushrooms in place of plastic. The big question, however, is- how exactly does this process work? To answer this question, we have looked at how Dell is making mushroom packaging for their products.

Adopting the method from Ecovative, Dell says that they begin growing their mushroom packaging by injecting spores into other natural materials commonly used in packaging such as rice hull. According to them, within a mere five to ten days of injecting the spores into the other materials, it can be completely formed into the mushroom packaging that they place their products in to ship. This process has proven effective not only for Dell, but also companies such as Steelcase and SealedAir. Ecovative has made a huge step towards zero waste packaging with their mushroom packaging.

Why is it such a big deal, anyway?

Mushroom packaging can eliminate waste in packaging, but what other benefits does it have? Mushroom packaging actually uses 98% less energy than Styrofoam, which has a dramatic impact on carbon. So far, customers appear to be extremely satisfied with the packaging, and Ecovative hopes to continue improving the mushroom packaging to keep customers happy.

Benefits of mushroom packaging

Mushroom packaging has been shown to have many uses and benefits. It has been used to ship industrial equipment, electronics, furniture, and even wine. This shows that the packaging is reliable and easy to ship.However, it is not just something cool to talk about shipping things in. Mushroom packaging has many benefits. It is cost effective, safe for the environment, non-abrasive, high performing, and can be custom fit to specific products, making it completely unique and customizable. Mushroom packaging really is one of a kind, and is currently transforming packaging as we know it.

References:

http://www.greenbiz.com/news/2010/08/10/mushroom-based-packaging-98-percent-less-energy-styrofoam

http://www.dell.com/learn/us/en/uscorp1/corp-comm/mushroom-packaging

http://www.ecovativedesign.com/mushroom-packaging

http://www.envirogadget.com/odd-gadgets/ecocradle-mushroom-packaging/

http://sealedair.com/product-care/product-care-products/restore-mushroom-packaging

http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/food/mushrooms.html

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